Pennsylvania article on Constitution, Green parties, proportional representation

“Parties embody a larger philosophy, which survives any one leader or any one election,” [Penn State professor] Woessner said, using Roosevelt’s Bull Moose Party as an example. “Unless the constitution was amended creating proportional representation, I predict no third party will ever survive for any length of time in America.”

You can read the rest of the Altoona Mirror article here.

7 Responses to “Pennsylvania article on Constitution, Green parties, proportional representation”

  1. NewFederalist Says:

    Good article. Unfortunately just about all the points it made are true. The current system is unfriendly to alternative parties and independent candidates.

  2. Trent Hill Says:

    Yes,the current system IS unfriendly to Third Parties.

    “Unless the constitution was amended creating proportional representation, I predict no third party will ever survive for any length of time in America.”

    This statement is, in itself, selfdefeating. The Constitution says nothing at all about the Electoral College. None of the election process is listed in the Constitution, therefor the point is moot.

  3. George Whitfield Says:

    The Libertarian Party has survived for thirty-five years. Although the current systems is unfriendly to it, the LP persists because there is a real need for a party that firmly and consistently stands for individual liberty. Thirty-five years may be relatively a short length of time compared to the history of the USA but the depth of desire by its members and supporters keeps the LP alive.

  4. undercover_anarchist Says:

    The Constitution says nothing about the electoral college??

  5. paulie cannoli Says:

    wikipedia

    The United States Electoral College is the official name of the group of Presidential Electors who are chosen every four years to cast the electoral vote and thereby elect the President and Vice President of the United States. It was established by Article Two, Section One of the United States Constitution, which provides for a quadrennial election of Presidential Electors in each state. The electoral process was modified in 1804 with the ratification of the 12th Amendment and again in 1961 with the ratification of the 23rd Amendment.

    p) It’s always struck me as tragicomic how many “constitutionalists” don’t really read their own constitution.

  6. Trent Hill Says:

    Um, the electoral college’s specifics are NOT mentioned in the Constitution. The Electoral College IS mentioned, although not by name, however its details (which are obviously biased now) are not.

  7. paulie cannoli Says:

    Here’s what it does say.

    Article II, Section I:

    The executive power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his office during the term of four years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same term, be elected, as follows:

    Each state shall appoint, in such manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit under the United States, shall be appointed an elector.

    The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves. And they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, and of the number of votes for each; which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The person having the greatest number of votes shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such majority, and have an equal number of votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President; and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest on the list the said House shall in like manner choose the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation from each state having one vote; A quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after the choice of the President, the person having the greatest number of votes of the electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal votes, the Senate shall choose from them by ballot the Vice President.

    The Congress may determine the time of choosing the electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes; which day shall be the same throughout the United States.

    Amendment XII

    The electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate;—The President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates and the votes shall then be counted;—the person having the greatest number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as President, as in the case of the death or other constitutional disability of the President. The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President, shall be the Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed, and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States.

    Amendment XXIII

    Section 1. The District constituting the seat of government of the United States shall appoint in such manner as the Congress may direct:

    A number of electors of President and Vice President equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives in Congress to which the District would be entitled if it were a state, but in no event more than the least populous state; they shall be in addition to those appointed by the states, but they shall be considered, for the purposes of the election of President and Vice President, to be electors appointed by a state; and they shall meet in the District and perform such duties as provided by the twelfth article of amendment.

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